Yeppoon 2.

Except for the guy who was barefoot, no shirt, with shorts hanging off his hips that wandered to the lake edge, scratched his balls, and wandered back somewhere into the bush, not a single person ever appeared, despite my excellent clapping to demand that they should.

Yeppoon 1. Part 2.

I love when you first arrive at a park. Everyone finds an excuse to come out and stand around in a crowd to assess the “new meat.” They consider your caravan, what you are pulling it with, how you drive, how you park, what you look like, and approachability.

Yeppoon. The Big Send Off.

We did a couple of trips to Yeppoon next. The first one was for about a week – a treat to be on the beach and to just get away brought to me… Continue reading

Wondai. The Wrap Up.

Derek and I do differ on a couple of things. He is all over using the campsite showers and bathrooms if we stop in a park. I prefer to use the ones in the caravan. Please remember that I am Canadian. We are very polite and very private. We are more into pretending that none of us ever have to go to the bathroom, thus we call them “bathrooms.” Our bathrooms are disguised are luxurious spa/libraries … with fireplaces, and water features and well-padded furniture. Here you have a room with a toilet in it. You call it “the toilet.”

Wondai. Part Three.

Don’t get me wrong, happy to unhook and enjoy nature but when Derek goes to play golf etc, I find things to do. And besides, have you ever accidentally gone away without saying anything and not checked in with your kids for a few hours? The national guard know our whole family by name … including middle and nicknames.

Wondai. Part Two.

The people of Wondai clearly were impressed. No-one sat near them as they sat facing everyone else, side by side, in the front, right in the middle. If this was a kingdom, they were king and queen. A wedding – the bride and groom. I was surprised no-one stopped to genuflect on their way to the salad bar.

Wondai. Part One.

The gentleman said he knew about awnings and came over with me. As he struggled to figure out how to take it down I wondered whether it would be worse to have the wind break it, or some stranger that I had invited over. I realized he was probably 90 years old and not even as tall as I was, although, he could have stood on his walker and reached the top peg.

Epilogue to Longreach

Derek and his son came home with eyes that disappeared when they blinked and even their teeth were coated in a fine brown paste, that cemented the flies right in there, some of them still flapping their wings and kicking their hind legs in protest. It was not sexy. They both had to be power hosed.

Longreach, The Big Finale.

Derek went to town and bought some spray and took care of the nest. End of the road for the Gympie wasps and their holiday to see the dinosaurs. I would like to cry for them but I don’t do insects. I would like to tell you I am a better person but I am not. They died and I ate my supper.

Long Reach, Part 4.

I LOVE not having any power and being stuck in the middle of nowhere. It is just like camping, with a tent, only instead of a tent and few things, you haul around this room with all these electric gadgets you get to look at, at night, in the dark, eating raw lamb chops because you have nothing to cook them on.